1830 – 1833 Counter Claims

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1830 to 1833

Britain had sent a warning to Buenos Aires in 1829, and for a while that government put some distance between itself and the island business enterprise of Luis Vernet, to the latter’s frustration. The lack of obvious support for his settlement from the Argentine Confederation appears to have pushed Vernet into taking matters into his own hands.

In an attempt to impose control over the sealing operations employed around the archipelago’s coasts by American and British vessels, Vernet seized three ships and arrested their captains. Aware of warnings sent him by Britain’s Consul, Woodbine Parish, Luis Vernet chose to seize American ships.

USS Lexington

USS Lexington

Within a short period of twelve months – December, 1831 to December, 1832 – those acts brought down upon the archipelago the USS Lexington in protection of its citizens, and HMS Clio in protection of British sovereignty.

Vernet had attempted to get Britain interested in his fledgling colony before, without success. In 1831 he lit the fuse that would result in the British return.

The settlement on East Falkland would continue, but without Luis Vernet.

 

Relevant Resources:

Port Louis 1831 (recorded 1834)

Plan of East Falkland Island 1831

Silas Duncan Commanding USS Lexington – Orders and Letters 1831-32

Apendice a los Documentos Oficiales publicado sobre el asunto de Malvinas 1832

Report of Luis Vernet addressed to the Foreign Ministry – August 10, 1832 (Transcription)

The United Services Journal and Naval and Military Magazine, 1832 part 3 (Transcription)

Extract from Darwin’s Diary – March, 1833 (Transcription)

Ambassador Moreno’s Published Protest 1833

Extract from Thomas Helsby’s Account of the Port Louis Murders 1833

British and Foreign State Papers 1832-1833 (pages 422-1153)

 

 

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